July 2016 saw the launch of a rebranded Mabuhay—the much-loved in-flight magazine of Philippine Airlines, the country's national flag carrier. The title’s upgrade by leading travel media company Ink includes spotlights of inspiring personalities from around the world, stories that motivate readers to explore and photo spreads that capture happenings across the airline's myriad of global destinations, as well as the Philippines’ magnificent islands. Both worldly and warm, the new Mabuhay provides loyal readers with a fresh approach.

I work as the second-in-command on all stages of copy—from idea conception to commissioning, line editing, copy editing, fact-checking, proofreading and final approval. I generate original features and upfront content, interview a range of profile subjects and supervise photography shoots. I also develop and manage a global network of freelance contributors, balance monthly budgets, create flat plans, liaise with the production department, take point on working with the sales team to devise creative advertorials and develop and maintain a consistent brand identity across all platforms.

The Kinfolk Home

In The Kinfolk Home, author Nathan Williams takes readers into 35 homes around the world that reflect the values of slow living: cultivating community, simplifying our lives and reclaiming time for what matters most. With 289 full-color photographs spanning 368 pages, The Kinfolk Home is a detailed exploration into living spaces from the United States, Scandinavia, Asia and more. Through a mix of portrait and interior photography, profiles and essays, readers are welcomed into the homes of designers, entrepreneurs, architects, photographers and stylists across five continents. Delving deeper than decor, Williams invites each resident to share how their ideals have shaped their homes and how their homes have in turn shaped them. At the heart of each living space is an aesthetic shaped by the dweller’s idea of what is essential—whether it’s a collection of inherited French antiques, a table long enough for a dinner party of a dozen or minimalist rooms reserved for creative thought. What each of these homes shares is that they’ve been put together carefully, slowly and with intention.

As the editorial coordinator, I carried out extensive initial research and served as the main point of contact for homeowners on all editorial and contract matters. I interviewed and penned feature profiles on sixteen subjects, generated all captions and administrative text and copy edited the publication. 

Kinfolk Issue 21: The Home Issue

This issue, we delve deeply into the nature of home, exploring what’s hidden, overlooked, unseen, mysterious and sensual. What do we perceive of the spaces we inhabit? Do our homes have lives and characters of their own? Do ordinary objects continue their lives without us after we die? We take a look at the home life of reclusive pianist Glenn Gould, and author Mary Roach explores the science behind why certain places make us uneasy. Sally Mann reflects in words and photographs on the spaces where artist Cy Twombly created some of his most iconic later works, while architect Joseph Dirand, who crafts interiors for Balenciaga and Rick Owens, refuses to view his own home as a living museum and instead sprawls nightly on the carpet with his family, drawing and listening to music. Within the pages of this issue, the home becomes more than the sum of its walls and floors, chairs and wallpaper—more than a collection of objects. The home and everything it contains are not merely ends in themselves, but the complex elements of each person’s evolving and deeply personal narrative—the foundations of a well-lived life.

Working with two senior editors, I copy edited and fact checked the publication and liaised with contributors to ensure content accuracy. I also managed all website content relating to the issue and generated creative and administrative text.

Kinfolk Issue 20: The Travel Issue

For the summer edition of Kinfolk, we want to draw attention not only to far-flung locations but also to those who choose to stay local and see their surroundings anew. Worldly experiences don’t start and end at the baggage claim, and it’s what we do with those memories once we’ve unpacked our suitcases that really makes a difference in the long run. After all, travel is a mentality as much as an action, so it doesn’t matter if our adventures start on the side of an alpine mountain or end in our living rooms. Simply getting out there and interacting with the world around us can be just as satisfying as any poolside retreat.

Working with two senior editors, I copy edited and fact checked the entire publication. I also managed all website content relating to the issue, generated administrative text, contributed to editorial meetings and wrote five profiles. 

Kinfolk Issue 19: The Adrenaline Issue

The spring edition of Kinfolk explores our relationship with adrenaline and its vital contribution to our quality of life. After all, finding joy in knuckle-whitening moments can be enlivening, not immobilizing. Whether it’s through leaping out of a plane at 14,000 feet or cutting off all our hair, or by cliff-diving into the sea or getting a tattoo, making friends with fear opens us up to a flurry of exhilaration. If we aspire to live life instead of just watch it, our days won’t be safe or stilted: The best stories start with the most unexpected moments, and these experiences normally come from confronting our comfort zones instead of taking the easy, expected or well-lit route.

Working with two senior editors, I copy edited and fact checked the entire publication. I also managed all website content relating to the issue, generated administrative text, contributed to editorial meetings and wrote two articles. 

Kinfolk Issue 18: The Design Issue

For our winter edition, we examine the relationship between community and design. How can design strengthen bonds with our families, friends and neighbors? And how can good design improve our quality of life? Design is a type of communication. It’s about the way an object or idea speaks to its audience. But good design not only gets its message across—it also engages us in a conversation. The voices in this issue’s pages have taught us that there’s no set of rules that govern what constitutes “good design.” Form doesn’t have to follow function, function doesn’t have to follow form—in fact, there shouldn’t be any following at all, only leading.

Working with two senior editors, I copy edited and fact checked the entire publication. I also managed all website content relating to the issue, generated administrative text, contributed to editorial meetings and wrote one article. 

Kinfolk Issue 17: The Family Issue

The autumn edition of Kinfolk explores the relationships we have with our nearest and dearest, in all of their iterations. We ask some big questions: How is photography changing the way we construct our family narratives? Should we feel guilty about speaking to our barista more than our sister? And did our parents actually have any idea what they were doing? Our concept of family is deeply personal and forever evolving. No matter what kind of family we come from or the type of family we want to create ourselves, there’s no longer a universal concept of “normal.” There’s no ubiquitous manual to consult, rules to follow or boxes to check. Well, maybe just a few: love, understanding, empathy and support. And perhaps a little patience.

Working with two senior editors and a fellow editorial assistant, I was involved with each stage of the production process—from initial brainstorming meetings to final proofing. I evaluated submissions, copy edited and fact checked the publication, carried out extensive research and penned six articles for the issue. 

Kinfolk Issue 16: The Essentials Issue

The Essentials Issue delves into the different meanings of life’s fundamentals and suggest ways we can incorporate them into our daily lives. We want to uncover the heart, the kernel, the foundation, the bedrock—whatever brings us back to our cores. Deciding what is essential in our lives isn’t about paring back our belongings and forgoing our beloved but unnecessary frivolities: Instead of determining how little we can live with, it’s about working out what we cannot live without.

Working with two senior editors and a fellow editorial assistant, I was involved with each stage of the production process—from initial brainstorming meetings to final proofing. I evaluated submissions, copy edited and fact checked the publication, carried out extensive research and penned five articles for the issue.